Why I Still Love Conjoint

Conjoint analysis, also referred to as discrete choice, has been in use for decades.  What has led to its popularity?  Why does it keep researchers, academicians, and research end-users engaged?  In short, why do we still love conjoint?

In 1983, as I was completing my MBA at the University of Chicago (now known as Booth), I had an interview with Joe Curry and Sue Weiss of John Morton Company.  They explained a market research technique, conjoint analysis, and discussed how this advanced

Conjoint Analysis / Discrete Choice   |  January 27, 2011

Using Discrete Choice and MaxDiff to Spend HR Dollars Wisely

Especially in times of shrinking budgets, it is critically important to allocate benefits dollars wisely.  Human Resources departments have the opportunity to use customer-focused approaches to maximize ROI.  Techniques such as Discrete Choice Analysis and MaxDiff can help companies maximize employee satisfaction for each dollar spent.

The Challenge
Many companies conduct routine surveys about employee satisfaction, perhaps even having employees rate benefits they are considering offering

Conjoint Analysis / Discrete Choice   |  August 31, 2010

Asking Discrete Choice Questions When the Answer is “It Depends”

Discrete choice questions are typically straightforward – “Which product do you prefer?”  However, in some situations, the respondent may be thinking, “It depends.” This article describes these situations and some possible solutions.

Identifying Issues in Discrete Choice Questions
In a conjoint/discrete choice exercise, respondents are typically asked a series of questions in which they must choose their preferred product or service among several, each with different combinations of

Conjoint Analysis / Discrete Choice   |  July 30, 2010

Using Share Predictions from Conjoint and Discrete Choice Models

When business decision-makers look at conjoint and discrete choice model output, how should the share results be interpreted and used?  In this post, we share our thoughts about preference share and market share, based on decades of practical experience. 

If you used a conjoint-based (or discrete choice) simulation model and saw the following output:

you might assume the figures represent market shares.  But, the output of a conjoint simulation model is known as a “share of preference.” 

Conjoint Analysis / Discrete Choice   |  July 26, 2010

Conjoint/Discrete Choice Model Output: What’s the Share About?

When business decision-makers look at conjoint and discrete choice model output, how should the share results be interpreted and used?  In this post, we share our thoughts about preference share and market share, based on decades of practical experience. 

If you used a conjoint-based (or discrete choice) simulation model and saw the following output:

you might assume the figures represent market shares.  But, the output of a conjoint simulation model is known as a “share of preference.” 

Conjoint Analysis / Discrete Choice   |  June 28, 2010

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